A map of the Alsace wine regionThe Pinot Noir is the only red wine produced in the Alsace region (East part of France, at the German Boarder), which is most commonly known for white wines. In decline since the 16th century, this light and fruity red wine has been attracting new interest over the past few years. Given its very low concentration of tannins, the Pinot Noir red wine pairs well with pork, poultry and even fish!

Originally from Burgundy, the Pinot Noir is the only red grape variety authorized under the designation “Alsace’’. Consequently among all the protected designations of origin (PDO) from Alsace, the Pinot Noir wine is the only red wine produced in the region. Records show that the Alsace region was a very large producer of red wines during the Middle Age. At the end of the 16th century, red wine production in the region started declining, and today only a few rural communities held true to this production – Ottrott, Saint Léonard, Boersch, Saint Hippolyte, Rodern, Marlenheim… The name “Pinot Noir d’Alsace” has been protected by a PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) since 1971.
The Pinot Noir vine is most adapted to temperate areas and clay-limestone terrains. It is known to be a restrictively productive vine, enabling the aromas and sugars to concentrate in the grape.

Traditionally, the Pinot Noir wine is aged for a short time. The result is a light, dry and fruity red wine. Hints of cherries and raspberries can be detected in the wine, which makes it a palatable companion of grilled meat (especially pork and poultry), spicy meals and even light chocolate desserts.

A young pinot noir leaf

A young pinot noir leaf

However, some producers are starting to age their Pinot Noir wine longer, making it stronger and more balanced. An aged Pinot Noir will develop flavors of mature cherries and leather. This type of Pinot Noir goes perfectly with red meat and game.